William Walt Whitman’s’ style of free verse (Poetry Foundation).

William  Carlos  Williams  as  a  Modernist  Poet          Since  the  beginning  of  Modernist  poetry  during  the  late  19th  century  and  the    early  20th  century,  many  poets  have  made  a  large  scale  contribution  to  the  field  of  English  literature.  Being  vastly  influenced  by  Imagist  poetry  which  emphasised  on  clear  and  sharp  use  of  language,  it  expanded  on  its  characteristics  and  broadened  its  scope  with  poets  from  America  and  Europe,  mostly  Britain,  contributing  significant  amount  of  their  work  to  this  Movement.  William  Carlos  Williams,  an  American  medical  practitioner,  essayist,  novelist,  playwright  and  a  poet  is  one  of  the  many  poets  whose  works  have  made  an  important  contribution  to  the  field  of  English  literature,  poetry  as  well  as  the  Modernist  Movement.          Williams  was  influenced  by  a  number  of  poets  and  scholars  from  whom  he  drew  inspiration  from.  He  was  influenced  by  John  Keats’  rhyming  tradition  and  metered  verse  and  at  the  same  time  was  also  influenced  by  Walt  Whitman’s’  style  of  free  verse (Poetry  Foundation).  One  significant  characteristic  of  Modernist  poetry  is  the  use  of  free  verse  in  a  considerable  number  of  poems  by  the  Modernist  poets  of  the  time  and  Williams  wrote  quite  a  number  of  poems  in  free  verse.  Modernist  poets  were  very  much  keen  on  doing  away  with  or  not  using  the  overly  descriptive  and  lyrical  style  of  writing  which  was  one  of  the  most  significant  characteristics  of  Romantic  and  Victorian  age  poetry.  Williams’  poems  like  ‘The  Red  Wheelbarrow’  and  ‘The  Great  Figure’  are  two  of  his  many  poems  which  follow  the  free  verse  style.  He  was  also  acquainted  with  Ezra  Pound,  who  not  only  influenced  Williams’  work  but  also  became  his  mentor.  He  joined  Pound  and  a  few  other  poets  like  Hilda  Doolittle  who  also  took  a  stand  against  writing  in  structured  and  rigid  forms  of  Victorian  and  Romantic  age  writing,   paving  way  for  the  Imagist  movement  which  later  provided  a  base  for  Modern  Poetry.  Later,  due  to  the  increasing  differences  in  thoughts  and  values,  where  Ezra  Pound  was  heavily  influenced  by  European  culture  and  tradition,  they  drifted  apart.          Most  of  the  poets  of  this  Movement  were  very  interested  in  experimenting  with  forms  and  styles  giving  rise  to  new  forms  of  poetry  writing.  After  splitting  up  from  under  the  guidance  of  Pound,  Williams  continued  to  experiment  with  new  techniques  of  meter  and  lineation.  As  he  was  no  longer  a  tutelage  of  Pound  who,  as  stated  before,  was  influenced  by  European  cultures  and  tradition,  Williams  had  the  freedom  to  refer  to  day  to  day  activities  in  the  life  of  Americans  making  him  one  of  the  influential  poets  of  Modernism  during  the  later  parts  of  the  19th  century.          Unlike  the  poems  from  the  era  before,  which  were  accessible  and  understood  only  by  the  upper  class  and  educated  section  of  the  society  and  also  by  those  who  had  a  sound  intellectual  backing  to  be  able  to  comprehend  the  poems  written  in  the  Victorian  era,  Williams’  poems  catered  to  the  comprehension  of  the  common  people  by  using  simple  language  and  structure.  Probably,  because  of  which  we  find  that  most  of  his  poems  are  very  short,  specific  and  concise.  One  example  for  such  a  poem  is  ‘The  red  wheelbarrow’,  one  of  his  most  famous  of  works  which  consists  of  a  single,  simple  sentence  which  runs  into  eight  lines,  with  the  simplest  of  structures,  form  and  vernacular  language.          A  majority  of  Modernist  poets  and  writers  have  exhibited  a  significant  amount  of  Freudian  influences  in  their  writings.  Freud,  whose  ideas,  theories  and  principles,  though  criticised  every  now  and  then,  were  widely  accepted  during  his  period.  While  most  Modernists  made  use  of  Freud’s  theories  of  Oedipus  complex,  Electra  complex,  Phallocentrism  and  so  on  in  their  work,  which  is  more  or  less  characteristic  of  Modernist  writing,  Williams  was  more  drawn  towards  Freud’s  findings  about  ‘Dreams’.  In  one  of  his  essays,  ‘The  Poem  as  a  field  of  Action’  he  borrows  from  the  Freudian  idea  of  dreams.  He  refers  to  a  poem  as  a  dream,  which  is  a  space  where  ideas  can  be  fulfilled  (PF,  1)  This,  at  the  same  time  draws  attention  to  the  fact  that  the  Industrial  Revolution  also  to  an  extent  influenced  the  form  and  structure  of  Modern  poetry.  Ever  since  the  Industrial  Revolution  “it  began  to  be  noticed  that  there  could  be  a  new  subject  matter  and  that  was  not  in  fact  the  poem  at  all” (Williams).  Thus,  though  Modernists  included  new  ‘subject’  matters,  that  is,  what  the  works/poems  reflect/ portray  at  first  glance,  in  their  work,  Williams  says  that  the  ‘measure’  of  the  poem,  which  is  the  reality  of  the  poem,  has  not  undergone  revolutionary  changes (PF).  But  different  Modernist  poets  across  America  and  Europe  contributed  differently  to  the  ‘new’  aspect  of  Modernism  which  might  not  necessarily  be  concerned  with  new  subject  matters  and  measures.          Depiction  of  ‘Alienation’  has  become  a  predominant  theme  in  numerous  Modern  poems.  Though  T. S. Eliot  has  set  a  benchmark  for  the  depiction  of  alienation  in  Modernist  poetry  writing,   many  a  poets  during  this  Movement  have  played    key  roles  in  its  contribution  in  order  to  make  the  theme  of  alienation  a  significant  feature  of  Modernist  Poetry.  The  two  World  Wars  which  preceded  the  Modernist  Movement,  had  left  the  world  with  a  large  scale  number  of  problems.  Issues  of  millions  of  lost  lives,  world  wide  poverty,  mass  destruction,  lack  of  means  to  recover  and  so  on  weighed  on  one  side  of  the  scale  whereas,  the  emotional  beating  the  people  involved  in  the  war  across  the  world  took  was  so  damaging  that  probably  even  if  they  were  able  to  sustain  themselves  economically,  the  emotional  trauma  caused  could  not  be  cured  for  years  to  come.  In  such  a  situation,  where  people  were  emotionally  alienated (sometimes  even  physically)  from  the  rest  of  the  world  seemed  to  be  much  more  relatable  to  a  vast  section  of  the  world.  As  a  result,  Modernism  which  succeeded  the  World  War  II,  aptly  described  or  showcased  the  feelings  of  a  sense  of  alienation  and  was  able  to  relate  to,  and  connect  with  a  large  number  of  people  irrespective  of  their  backgrounds,  as  it  was  not  just  the  upper  class  section  of  the  society  that  suffered  the  effects  of  the  World  War,  thus  making  Modernist  poetry  applicable  and  relatable  to  the  common  man,  as  mentioned  before,  and  also  making  it  relative  to  the  population  of  that  time  by  talking  about  shared  feelings.          Williams’  poem  ‘The  Great  Figure’   is  an  example  for  a  poem  that  addresses  ‘alienation’.  In  the  poem,  the  speaker  sees  a  red  fire  truck  enter  his  line  of  sight  without  paying  heed  to  the  rain  and  the  ‘gong  clangs’  through  the  ‘dark  city’.  Though  there  is  no  indication  of  the  fire  truck  leaving,  it  is  clearly  implied  as  the  speaker  only  sees  the  truck  moving;  without  an  indication  of  it  stopping  anywhere  in  the  short  poem.  The  entry  of  the  ‘red’  fire  truck  during  a  dark  and  rainy  day  seems  like  a  breath  of  fresh  air  but  this  is  a  temporary  change  as  the  truck  just  passes  by  without  stopping,  leaving  behind  the  rainy  dark  city  and  also  the  speaker  who  happened  to  chance  upon  it.   This  gives  the  readers  a  sense  of  alienation  as  the  speaker  is  left  behind  without  any  indication  of  human  presence  around  him.            Along  with  ‘alienation’,  the  poem  also  reflects  the  disassociated  modern  day  world.  It  shows  how,  since  the  Industrial  Revolution,  the  world  has  become  so  detached  and  fast  paced.  It  seems  like  people  in  the  current  day  world  are  only  concerned  about  their  own  self  that  they  do  not  even  bother  to  stop  for  a  while  and  take  note  of  the  world  around  them.  The  red  fire  truck  is  symbolic  of  such  a  life,  that  is,  the  Modern  day  life.  The  colour  ‘red’  indicates  the  flashy  life  people  lead  and  its  “tense  unheeded” (Williams)  movement  shows  our  one  directional  and  fast  paced  life  and  the  truck  leaving  indicates  how  our  lives  are  unstopping  and  unbothered  when  the  world  is  “among  the  rain” (Williams).  Williams,  thus,  beautifully  juxtaposes  the  theme  of  alienation  and  the  degenerating  state  of  the  world  in  a  matter  of  few  simple  words  and  lines.          Modernist  Movement  focussed  on  introducing  something  ‘new’  to  various  discourses  and  in  quite  a  number  of  poems,  Williams  has  made  attempts  to  incorporate  the  essence  of  newness  in  them.  In  ‘The  Red  Wheelbarrow’  the  mentioning  of  the  words  “glazed  with  rain  water”  is  the  indicator  of  something  new.  Rain  is  a  symbol  of  life  and  regeneration.  Zaenal  Abidin,  in  his  thesis  ‘Visual  Imagery  in  William  Carlos  Williams  Poems’  associates  rain  water  with  Spring  season  which  is  symbolic  of  new  life.  In  his  paper,  Abidin  also  mentions  that  phrases/lines  like  “sumac  buds”,   “raw  sods”  and  “…opening  hearts  of  lilac  leaves”  in  the  poem  ‘April’  and  “masses  of  flowers”,  “cherry  branches”,  “…yellow  and  some  red”  in  ‘A  Widow’s  lament  in  Springtime’  are  all  indicators  of  the  Spring  theme.  Thus,  Williams  tries  to  portray  in  his  poems,  a  sense  of  newness  which  is  more  or  less  a  defining  characteristic  of  the  Modernist  movement.  However,   in  the  poem  ‘A  Widow’s  lament  in  Springtime’,  the  mood  is  more  reminiscing  and  melancholic  though  it  is  set  against  a  pleasant  Spring  background.  This  could  be  interpreted  as  the  actual  representation  of  the  disconnected  or  detached  world  post  the  Industrial  Revolution  where  human  emotions  took  a  back  seat  and  the  material  world  captured  attention.  On  the  other  hand,  though  this  poem  was  published  in  1921,  it  is  rightly  applicable  to  the  post  World  War  II (1945)  scenario  where  the   widow’s  depressive  and  self  destructive  state  acts  as  indicators  of  the  destroyed  state  of  the  world  and  the  happy,  spring  like  surrounding  acts  as  an  indicator  of  hope  and  new  beginnings.  Either  way,  the  mood  set  by  Williams  is  more  rejuvenating  than  depressing  which  makes  the  poem  also  classify  as  an  indicator  of  the  ‘new’.          Making  intertextual  references  in  poetry  is  also  a  characteristic  feature  of  Modernist  Poetry.  However,  his  practice  was  not  initiated  during  the  Modernist  Movement.  Plays,  novels  and  poetries  dating  back  to  the  Renaissance  period  and  prior  to  it  have  made  use  of  this  practice.  Writers  and  poets  have  always  used  it  to  write  back  to  their  literary  rivals  or  in  praise  of  their  mentors,  friends  or  idols  or  in  order  to  humour  the  readers  in  unlikely  situations.  Such  references  were  not  limited  to  just  literature,  as,  paintings  with  references  to  Biblical  situations  have  also  been  a  part  of  the  European  culture  for  as  long  as  one  can  remember.  In  the  case  of  paintings,  the  painting  which  stands  as  one  of  the  best  examples  for  such  a  reference  during  the  Modernist  Movement  is  the  ‘Dream  caused  by  the  Flight  of  a  Bee  around  a  Pomegranate  a  Second  before  Awakening’   by  Salvador  Dali  in  1944.  Here,  Dali  has  shown  the  Modern  world’s  interest  in  psychology  and  Freudian  theories  and  has  also  made  references  to  Gian  Lorenzo  Bernini’s  ‘Elephant  and  Obelisk’  sculpture  and  as  well  as  to  the  Theory  of  Revolution.    In  the  case  of  poetry,  T. S.  Eliot  has  once  again  made  spectacular  intertextual  references  to  literary  works  from  across  the  world.  Williams  too  took  part  in  making  such  a  reference  in  his  poem  ‘Spring  and  All’  by  referring  to  Eliot’s  ‘The  Waste  Land’.   Where  Eliot’s  interpretation  of  the  world  post  World  War  I  was  more  melancholic  in  nature,  Williams  took  a  different  approach  by  looking  at  it  as  a  new  start/  beginning.  The  title  of  the  said  poem,  with  its  reference  to  spring,  once  again  gives  a  hopeful  tone  for  the  ‘new’  world.  It  was  only  after  the  publishing  of  ‘Spring  and  All’   in  the  year  1923  did  Williams  shoot  to  fame  making  him  one  of  the  talented  poets  in  the  canon  of  Modernist  poetry.  Meanwhile,  Williams’  friend  and  painter  Charles  Demuth’s  painting  ‘I  Saw  the  Figure  5  in  Gold’  was  created  with  reference  to  Williams’  poem  ‘The  Great  Figure’  which  makes  Williams’  work  also  a  subject  to  the  practice  of  intertextual  referencing  and  inspiration.          Although  William  Carlos  Williams  was  not  as  famous  as  most  other  Modernist  poets  like  T. S. Eliot,  Ezra  Pound,  Wallace  Stevens,  E. E. Cummings,  Hilda  Doolittle,  James  Joyce  and  the  likes  of  them,  his  contributions  to  the  vast  field  of  Modernist  literature,  especially  Modernist  poetry,  cannot  be  disregarded.  A  majority  of  his  poems  exhibit  the  distinguished  characteristics  of  Modern  Poetry  in  ways  that  are  simplistic,  understandable  and  relatable  which  makes  him  one  of  the  instrumental  poets  of  Modernist  Poetry.Works  Cited  Williams,  William  C.  1954.  Essay  on  poetic  theory:  Introduction.  The  poem  is  a  field  of  action.  Poetry Foundation. Web. 13  Oct  2009  Williams,  William  C.  The  Poem  is  a  Field  of  Action,  NYC.  1954.  Print.  New   Directions  Abidin,  Zaenal.  Visual  Imagery  in  William  Carlos  Williams  Poems.  Diss.  State  Islamic  University,  Jakarta,  2010.  UINJKT- IR.  Web.  18  Jan  2018. BibliographyPoetry  Foundation.orghttps://www.poetryfoundation.org/articles/69393/the-poem-as-a-field-of-actionhttps://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/william-carlos-williamsSpringer  Linkhttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-1-349-27433-8_2Poets.orghttps://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/william-carlos-williamsWikipediahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_and_Allhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ImagismTucker,  Robert  L. G.  William  Carlos  Williams  in  the  1930s.  Diss.  U  College  London, UCL  Discovery.  Web.  18  jan  2018