Position . But, i also agree the bad outweighs

                                                                              Position Paper                                                                                                                                      CLU3M                                                                                                             Trinity Craig-HiddlestonThe Canadian Legal System is something I feel every Canadian knows is broken and unfair , but is something we continue to pretend is  not and is also something that is pushed to the side, or is talked down upon with no further desire to make a change in how we are controlled. Many Canadians can agree the system has failed us. Yes, I believe the Canadian legal system does set many fair boundaries to ensure our safety and well being and creates essential  morals . But, i also agree the bad outweighs the good in many cases and that we have laws that are unnecessary for our well beings.  I believe there are many unfair sentencings, unfair laws and lots of missing and hidden pieces in cases and leaving victims with leaving the victim defeated.  I strongly believe that victims of crimes  are treated unfairly and are left to deal with grief while the system is unfair while deciding consequences.Many cases are treated poorly due to the unfair legal system. It is very broken and needs to be fixed.  Our justice system is extremely forgiving when it comes to substantial criminals. Oftentimes criminals do not get the discipline they deserve while the victims are left with an unsatisfied with an unfair ending. While the convicted are left with a simple slap on the wrist and a record that could be wiped overtime. This happens for many reasons. Whether its due to wealth, or simply missing/hidden evidence. We as Canadians are controlled by the legal system and have little say in the seriousness of crimes committed and how they should be dealt with. All decisions are made by higher authority with little acceptance to what society believes is fair. In just two cases masses of Ontarians should be aware of already are the cases of the three women who accused Jian Ghomeshi of  unpleasant violent acts and the case of the Toronto parking enforcement officer who declared she was raped by three Toronto police officers in a hotel room. In both cases, the accused men were found not guilty .In the Ghomeshi and Toronto police officer cases, it is obvious that the reason for the not guilty conclusions is because the judges did not believe the women. In sexual assault cases, there is rarely sustaining evidence to back up the victim’s statement, so trials become latitudes of his word against hers. Within a judge’s view of what is possible in today’s day in age, the subject to accusation gets away with their actions with clean hands. Another argument I feel is another major issue in fairness when it comes to the legal system in Canada is privileges. . Wealthy people are more likely  to have a better chance at not being convicted as they have the money to get better lawyer, which increases their chances of getting away with their charges. These people also tend to have better connections and growing up in upper class families can be extremely helpful in most cases. Wealth can also help with bail costs opposed to someone less successful and cannot cover the costs of bail and are left with the worse consequences, which in most cases is jail.  The punishment should fit the crime for all people and should be the same punishment for the same crime committed with no acceptations. .Unfortunately,If two men commit the same serious crimes, one wealthy and the other not so wealthy. The wealthy man can easily afford bail and is let go from his real punishment while the less fortunate man cannot afford bail and is left  serving time and truly learning his lesson is usually how the system works. I feel as if the government focuses  too much on equality than equity. If two people go to trial for the same offence, they should both have the exact consequences. The legal system cannot be fair if others have advantages against others. My last argument is There have been expanded analysis  on racism in the system in Canada, usually commonly utilizing statistical research to prove racism exists in the legal system. Studies show that provincially, First Nations are confined at rates that are 6/7 times the overall provincial rate. For example, in Manitoba, 60% of prisoners in  jails are First Nations Peoples, while 70% of women in provincial jails, and 75% of juveniles in Winnipeg’s detention centres, This is why it is essential to consider not only the results of racism, but also the processes that lead to the current realities. In crimes of violence,including assault cases there are more non-Aboriginal people violating these crimes than there are Aboriginals who commit these crimes but because of the government’s racism, on average about 50-60% of the non-Aboriginal people who commit these crimes get probation or can post bail whereas an Aboriginal or visible minority committing  the crime is almost certain jail time, on average between 60-70% will serve a term in jail.In general, I agree Canada’s legal system does set many valuable boundaries and morals to benefit the safety and  wellbeing of communities throughout the country. But as I added before, the bad outweighs the good. Many victims and convicts do not receive the justice they deserve. Many are left with either unfair or receive too easy of a let off. I believe many things need to be changed but will never be done about it. The system has failed canada for years now and would take far too many to undo all of the mistakes made by the government.  And unfortunately once again wealth and connections  typically have the upper hand when it comes to the legal system. And the government is the highest wealth in the country. Therefore, whatever they say goes and we unfairly have to obey.