“It His parents noticed a small personality change after

            “It was on the moral side, and in my
own person, that I learned to recognize the thorough and primitive duality of
man; I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the fields of my
consciousness…” tried to convey that Mr. Hyde was a separate person, but Dr.

Jekyll could not fool everyone (Stevenson 122/161). Dr. Jekyll used Mr. Hyde as
a scapegoat for his crimes. Many criminals can be found to be alike to Dr.

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Jekyll because most of them have their own Mr. Hyde, internally. One criminal
in particular is very easy to compare Dr. Jekyll and Ted Kaczynski, the
Unabomber.

            Ted Kaczynski’s had many events that
occurred throughout his life that helped form the terror of the Unabomber. As a
baby, he was isolated because of an allergic reaction to some medication. His
parents noticed a small personality change after he came back. In school, he
was a very intelligent student and skipped two grades and at sixteen, Kaczynski
received a scholarship to Harvard University, where he studied mathematics. People
always saw him as different and weird because of his intelligence. There he was
part of a psychological experiment in which participants were verbally abused.

After graduating, he got his doctorate from the University of Michigan. He was
praised there and he, also, taught some classes there. Then, he went west to
teach at the University of California, Berkeley. He had a difficult time there
so he resigned and moved to Montana to live in the wilderness. In 1978, he
moved back to Chicago to work with his brother, but he ended up getting fired.  After all this, he could not stand society
anymore so he began his bombing spree. This how he felt about our society,
“Imagine a society that subjects people to conditions that make them terribly
unhappy…” (Industrial Society and Its Future).

            So they have a few similar
characteristics. Dr. Jekyll and Ted Kaczynski were both smart; they both had
doctorate degrees. Arguably, they both had success in their fields and where
well-known there. After they were caught, they both were suicidal. Dr. Jekyll
was able to kill himself, but Kaczynski was not. Some evidence to back this up
from Sasponsik “The final suicide is thus fittingly a dual effort: though the
hand that administers the poison is Edward Hyde’s, it is Henry Jekyll who
forces the action” (724). These attributes caused people who were close to them
to stop talking to them. For Dr. Jekyll this person was Dr. Lanyon and for
Kaczynski it was his brother David.

Their actions were very similar as well. They
both committed crimes against innocent people. Dr. Jekyll did it as Mr. Hyde,
while Kaczynski did it through packaged bombs. This shows that they both cared
about their reputations because if Kaczynski did not care about his reputation
he would just go to these buildings and shoot everyone.  In addition, they were both cruel and
ruthless and as time passed there violence got worse. For instance, Mr. Hyde
started by hurting a little girl to murdering Mr. Carew, just as Kaczynski
began with small bombs that just injured people, but later on his bombs became
stronger and he, eventually, killed someone.

Therefore, Ted Kaczynski and Dr. Jekyll
were very alike. They both committed violence against innocent people. Even
though they did these horrible things, they still thought it was important to
protect their reputations.

 

 

Works Citied

Kaczynski,
Ted. “Industrial Society and Its future.” Full text of “Industrial Society and
Its Future – The Unabomber’s Manifesto”, archive,org/stream/IndustrialSocietyAndItsFuture-
TheUnabombersManifesto/IndustrialSocietyAndItsFuture-theUnabomberManifesto_djvu.txt.

Pilkington,
Ed. “My brother, the Unabomber.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 14
Sept. 2009, www.theguardian.com/world/2009/sep/15/my-brother-the-unabomber.

Sasponik,
Irving S. The Anatomy of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Rice University,
www,jstor.org/stable/449833

Stevenson,
Robert Louis. The strange case of Dr.

Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Masterwork Books, 1998