At to their perches, the animals settled down in

At first, I thought this was just for the animals. However, this can have multiple meanings. It can represent how the communist supporters had to work very hard to overthrow the government. Also, it can explain how people must work hard to get to their goal. Later in the chapter, “…the uproar awoke Mr. Jones, who sprang out of bed, making sure that there was a fox in the yard. He seized the gun which always stood in a corner of his bedroom, and let fly a charge a number 6 shot into the darkness. The pellets buried themselves in the wall of the barn and the meeting broke up hurriedly. Everyone fled to his own sleeping-place. The birds jumped on to their perches, the animals settled down in the straw, and the whole farm was asleep in a moment.” Initially I just brushed this off as Mr. Jones thinking someone broke into his barn, and firing off a shot to scare the robbers off. But with research, I believe it represents the communist movement breaking up. Once again, this supports that in general, a symbol can’t be reduced to standing for only one thing. If they can, it’s not symbolism, it’s allegory.Beasts of England, beasts of Ireland, Beasts of every land and clime, Harken well and spread my tidings Of the golden future time.”For that day we all must labour, Though we die before it break; Cows and horses, geese and turkeys, All must toil for freedom’s sake.Bright will shine the fields of England, Purer shall its waters be, Sweeter yet shall blow its breezes On the day that sets us free.Riches more than mind can picture, Wheat and barley, oats and hay, Clover, beans, and mangel-wurzels Shall be ours upon that day.Rings shall vanish from our noses, And the harness from our back, Bit and Spur shall be rust forever, Cruel whips no more shall crack.Soon or late the day is coming, Tyrant Man shall be o’erthrown, And the fruitful fields of England Shall be trod by beasts alone.”Beasts of England, beasts of Ireland, Beasts of every land and clime, Hearken to my joyful tidings Of the golden future time.The scene I chose to analyze from George Orwell’s “Animal Farm” is the very beginning of the book, where the animals sneak out to hear Old Major’s speech. The chapter I’m using from “How to Read Literature Like a Professor” to compare to this scene in Animal Farm is chapter 12, “Is That A Symbol?” In this chapter we learn that most anything has at least 2 different symbols, while if they can have only one symbol, it’s allegory. “So some symbols do have a relatively limited range of meanings, but in general, a symbol can’t be reduced to standing for only one thing. If they can, it’s not symbolism, it’s allegory.” The first thing I want to analyze is the song Old Major teaches to the other animals, the poem Beasts of England. It says: